Acculturation, Cultural Values, and Breastfeeding in Overweight or Obese, Low-Income, Hispanic Women at 1 Month Postpartum

Cha Nam Shin, Elizabeth Reifsnider, Darya McClain, Mihyun Jeong, David P. McCormick, Michael Moramarco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Most Hispanic infants are fed formula during the first 6 weeks, and although 80% of Hispanic women initiate breastfeeding, rates of exclusive breastfeeding are much lower. Research aim: The purpose was to examine the influence of acculturation and cultural values on the breastfeeding practices of pregnant women of Mexican descent participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children who were enrolled in a prospective randomized clinical trial that aimed to reduce child obesity. The data were abstracted from a larger randomized clinical trial focused on prevention of child obesity. Methods: The sample consisted of 150 women of Mexican origin who were enrolled at the time of these analyses from the randomized clinical trial and had a prepregnancy body mass index of ≥ 25 and spoke English and/or Spanish. All breastfeeding data for this report came from data collection at 1 month postpartum. Results: A higher score on the Anglo orientation scale of the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans was associated with less breastfeeding at 1 month postpartum and less exclusive breastfeeding. Conclusion: Acculturation plays a role in breastfeeding practice. Exploring acculturation associated with breastfeeding can guide us to design culturally relevant interventions to promote breastfeeding exclusivity among immigrant mothers.

LanguageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Human Lactation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 1 2018

Fingerprint

Acculturation
Breast Feeding
Hispanic Americans
Postpartum Period
Randomized Controlled Trials
Pediatric Obesity
Food Assistance
Infant Formula
Pregnant Women
Body Mass Index
Mothers

Keywords

  • acculturation
  • and Children
  • breastfeeding
  • cultural values
  • Infants
  • Mexican American
  • Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Acculturation, Cultural Values, and Breastfeeding in Overweight or Obese, Low-Income, Hispanic Women at 1 Month Postpartum. / Shin, Cha Nam; Reifsnider, Elizabeth; McClain, Darya; Jeong, Mihyun; McCormick, David P.; Moramarco, Michael.

In: Journal of Human Lactation, 01.03.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shin, Cha Nam ; Reifsnider, Elizabeth ; McClain, Darya ; Jeong, Mihyun ; McCormick, David P. ; Moramarco, Michael. / Acculturation, Cultural Values, and Breastfeeding in Overweight or Obese, Low-Income, Hispanic Women at 1 Month Postpartum. In: Journal of Human Lactation. 2018.
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